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Facebook Pages: Usage Patterns

Executive summary

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Pages attract business users to Facebook and lead the social network’s efforts to earn advertising revenues. However, this study of 5.7 million Facebook Pages shows that business users are still struggling to adapt to Facebook as an engagement opportunity. The study updates the findings of a similar research conducted by Recommend.ly in March 2012.

The current study discovered low levels of active Pages, fall in average number of posts and a huge drop in engagement rates since March. Page owners clearly need to do more to make Facebook work for them.

The study also found that the share of visual content on Pages has increased after the introduction of Timeline view for Pages. Also, it is found that Pages selecting specific category names such as ‘Spa’ or ‘Restaurant’ tend to be more focused and get better engagement from fans, compared to Pages choosing generic sounding category names such as ‘Local Business’.

 

Key Findings

  • About 2 out 3 Facebook Pages are inactive in some way:
    • 63.9 per cent Pages have no cover photo
    • 70.1 per cent Pages make 0 posts a month
    • 83.4 per cent Pages never participated in conversations
    • 50 per cent Pages have less than 300 fans
  • Pages are found to be making lesser posts in October 2012 compared to March 2012. Average number of Page posts fell by 19 per cent since March.
  • Engagement Rates of Page posts across categories have fallen since March by an average of 40 per cent
  • 50-60 per cent of content on Pages is now visual content (photos or videos) compared to just 15-20 per cent in March

 

Introduction

Facebook Pages (popularly known as ‘Fan Pages’) are a starting point for businesses wanting to connect to millions of potential and existing customers on Facebook. A Page allows brands to disseminate marketing and service information fast and lets customers interact directly with stake holders. Pages are also an important component of Facebook’s own revenue model[i] as 89% of Facebook’s total revenues come from brands advertising on the platform and Facebook attracts brands through Pages.

The past six months have been significant for Facebook Page owners. In the run up to its IPO and subsequently too, Facebook released a host of features such as the Timeline view, Offers, post scheduling and targeting, post-level promotions, group promotions, redesigned ad network, FB exchange etc to make Pages more attractive to businesses. The six month period has also seen a conscious effort by Facebook, and the social media industry in general, to raise awareness about Pages as potent social marketing properties.

In March 2012, we’ve studied the usage patterns of Facebook Pages in detail and released it to much appreciation from the social media industry. The full report can be found here.

The current study conducted in September – October 2012 provides extensive insights into Page usage by brands, and also updates the findings of the March study.

Objectives of the study

  • How are various categories of business using Facebook for marketing
  • What are the key behaviors of successful marketers on Facebook

Methodology

Facebook had 37 million Pages with 10 or more likes as of December 31, 2011[ii]. An updated number is not disclosed by Facebook subsequently, but we expect the number to exceed 50 million Pages by the end of 2012[iii].

For the purpose of this study, we used a sample of 5.76 million Facebook Pages with 10 or more likes. In our estimation, the sample represents more than 10 per cent of the universe. We gathered Page URLs for the sample collected from public directories. Using Facebook’s API, we collected Page data for up to 30 days all the Pages in the sample.

Parts of the study use a subset of 2.94 million Pages, to study specific patterns of various categories.

We carried out Conversation Score (http://cscore.recommend.ly) analysis to measure the effectiveness of the sample Pages.

In a similar study published in March 2012, we used a sample of 4.12 million Pages and a subset of 1.69 million Pages for studying specific patterns of various categories. Both October and March samples have a confidence level of 99% and confidence interval of less than 0.2%.

Sample size of the study

  • Sample for the study consists of 5.76 million Facebook Pages with 10 or more likes
  • A smaller sample of 2.94 million Pages (subset) was used to study specific usage patterns of various Page categories

Facebook Page categories

 

A.      Categories distribution

 Figure 1: Facebook Top Level Categories

Facebook allows 6 top level categories for Pages, and 160 sub-categories within them. Categories are important identifiers of a Page’s content.

For example, Rihanna’s Page is identified as a ‘Musician/Band’ Page, which is a sub-category of ‘Artist, band or public figure’. President Bill Clinton’s Page is categorized as ‘Public figure’, which is also part of the same top level category – ‘Artist, band or public figure’.

Even though Facebook currently offers 160 sub-categories, the list varies from time to time. The sample drawn in March had 273 sub-categories, which has come down to 204 in the October 2012 sample. Facebook has actively tried to clean up this list in recent times, with the intention of narrowing down the list to precise descriptions. The efforts appear to be paying off.

Facebook gives more importance to business Pages with five out of six top level categories representing business in some way. Only Community Pages can be said to be purely non-business.

Top Category

Mar-12

Oct-12

% Change

Brand or Product

7.5%

6.4%

-15.4%

Community

38.4%

36.9%

-3.8%

Company/Orgn

3.7%

9.7%

162.4%

Entertainment

6.8%

9.4%

39.7%

Local Business

18.0%

17.4%

-3.6%

Personal Brand

25.6%

20.2%

-21.1%

Table 1: Category distribution of Facebook Pages

  • Cause/community Pages get a lion’s share of Facebook Pages with 36.9 per cent share
  • Personal brand Pages (Artist, band or public figure) rank second with 20.2 per cent. Personal Pages saw a significant decline in share from March
  • Company Pages gained the most share with an increase from 3.7 per cent in March to 9.7 per cent in October, revealing an increasing interest in Facebook as a marketing platform by businesses

 Figure 2: Category distribution of Facebook Pages

Category Distribution

  • 63.1 per

    cent of Facebook Pages have a business connection in some way. Only Community Pages constituting 36.9 per cent can be said to be purely non-business

 

 

B.      Top 10 sub-categories

 

In spite of the availability of 160 sub-categories, 70.2 per cent of the Pages fall within just 10 sub-categories on Facebook. Community category alone contributes to 36.9 percent.

Facebook sub-categories overlap quite a bit. For example, School and University are sub-categories in both ‘Local Business’ and ‘Company’. Cause and Community are distinct sub-categories of ‘Company’, but also combine to form a separate top level category[iv]. For a user, this may be leading to quite a bit of confusion. The following table shows that users select generic sounding categories as a result of this ambiguity, which may not be advisable. Later in the study, we will see that Pages selecting specific category names such as ‘Spa’ or ‘Restaurant’ tend to be more focused and get better engagement from fans.

Category

Percentage

Cause or Community > Community

36.9%

Local Business > Local Business

8.3%

Personal Brand > Musician/Band

7.0%

Personal Brand > Public Figure

4.8%

Company / Organization > Company

3.9%

Local Business > School

2.1%

Company / Organization > Non-Profit Organization

2.0%

Personal Brand > Artist

1.9%

Brand or Product > Product/Service

1.7%

Entertainment > Book

1.6%

Table 2: Top 10 sub-categories on Facebook

  • Community category Pages dominate the top 10 list with 36.9 per cent share
  • Local business Pages rank second, showing that there is rapid adoption of social media by local businesses

Top 10 Categories

  • The top 10 list comprises of generic category names such as ‘Community’, ‘Local Business’, ‘Company’, ‘Public Figure’ etc. It is possible that the users find it difficult to find the specific category name that describes their business accurately, leading to the selection of generic names.

Fan count and Page activity

A.      Fan count distribution

Building fan communities is the fundamental objective of Facebook Pages. Even though a few ‘superstar’ Pages with millions of fans get all the attention, the average fan count of Pages is just 6,825 fans. This has slightly increased from the 6,400 average fan count observed in March. The growth rate in average fan count is 0.55 per cent, compared to 0.92 per cent monthly growth in Facebook’s users in the corresponding period.

Fan count range Share Cumulative share

10 – 100

36.4%

36.4%

101 – 1k

36.8%

73.3%

1k – 10k

20.6%

93.8%

10k – 100k

5.2%

99.0%

100k – 1 mn

0.9%

99.9%

1 mn+

0.1%

100.0%

Table 3: Fan count distribution

  • 73.3 per cent of Facebook Pages have less than 1,000 fans and 99 per cent have less than 100,000 fans
  • Only 0.1 per cent of Pages get to the coveted million fans mark
  • Even though the arithmetic mean is 6,825 fans, 50% of Facebook Pages have less than 300 fans

Figure 3: Cumulative Fan Distribution


Sample of 2.94 million Pages
 

To analyze the specific patterns, we have chosen 9 sub-categories representing Business, Personal brands and Community pages. These 9 categories comprise of 2.94 million Pages. Sub-categories selected were same as the ones chosen for the March study, which had a sample size of 1.7 million pages.

This sample comprises of:

  1. “Personal brands” – Musician/Band, Actor/Director and Public Figure
  2. “Business” categories – Local business, Company / organization, Restaurants and Spas+
  3. “Interest” categories – Community

This mix was chosen to distinguish the habits of Pages with varying objectives on Facebook.

Category-wise break up of the sample (2.94 million) Pages:

Figure 4: Category break-up  in Sample

B.      Category-wise fan counts

Personal brand Pages led the Facebook revolution in the past 3-4 years with celebrities and public figures accumulating millions of fans and racing with each other to the top. This reflects in the statistics as well, with personal brands leading the statistics for average fan count.

Category

Average Fans

Mar-12

Average Fans

Oct-12

% change

Actor/director

11,622

13,371

15.0%

Community

3,163

6,148

94.4%

Company

7,429

4,881

-34.3%

Local business

6,265

2,687

-57.1%

Musician/band

12,406

14,854

19.7%

Politician

5,716

8,516

49.0%

Public figure

5,539

6,952

25.5%

Restaurant/cafe

3,868

2,222

-42.6%

Spas+

1,391

1,022

-26.5%

Table 4: Average fans per category

Figure 5: Average fans per category

  • Personal brands (Actor, Musician, Politician, Public figure) average at 11,713 fans per Page, up from 9,144 in March
  • Business category Pages have seen a steep fall in fan count – from 6,407 fans per Page to just 3,233 fans in October
  • Top 4 ranks in average fan count belong to the personal brands, unlike in March when Company and Local business categories occupied the 3rd and 4th ranks
  • The average fan count for community Pages has gone up from 3,163 in March to 6,148 in October

Fan count distribution

  • 50% of Facebook Pages fail to get more than 300 fans. However, the mean fan count is 6,825 fans showing that a few large Pages are skewing the data

 

C.      Page activity

In spite of the presence of massive number of Pages on Facebook, not all Pages are actively creating conversations and managing their communities.

Example: In Facebook’s own estimation, there are 11 million small business Pages on Facebook, out of which 3 million make at least one post per week. Facebook also says that 7 million Pages out of 11 are ‘active’, probably referring to Pages making at least 1 post per month[v].

Our study shows that the level of activity is much lower and we applied three different criteria to measure activity levels:

i.              Posting habits

Experts recommend regular posting to a Page to get the attention of fans. However, not all Page owners can source content regularly or take time out to post every day (even though Facebook itself recommends at least one update per day)

Our study found that 70.1 per cent of Facebook Pages did not make even one post per month. Following table illustrates the posting habits across various categories:

Category

0 updates

per month

1 – 5 updates

per month

6 – 99 updates

per month

100+ updates

per month

Actor/director

67.2%

9.0%

18.5%

5.2%

Community

79.3%

5.6%

11.3%

3.8%

Company

73.5%

7.2%

17.8%

1.6%

Local business

60.6%

10.9%

27.0%

1.6%

Musician/band

54.4%

13.4%

28.5%

3.8%

Politician

54.5%

9.6%

30.4%

5.5%

Public figure

72.6%

7.5%

16.2%

3.8%

Restaurant/cafe

39.4%

15.1%

44.5%

1.0%

Spas+

31.1%

18.3%

48.7%

1.9%

Total

70.1%

8.2%

18.6%

3.2%

Table 5: Posting habits of various categories

  • During the March study, we found that 82.3% Pages made 5 updates or less per month. This figure has only marginally improved by October, with 78.3 per cent of Pages still making 5 updates or less per month
  • Community Pages show the least activity, with 79.3 per cent Pages making no updates at all
  • Close on heels are the Company Pages with 73.5 per cent Pages inactive. This is especially surprising since data shows that the share of Company Pages on Facebook is only going up
  • Pages selecting a more specific category name, e.g., ‘Restaurants’ or ‘Spas’, tend to be more active and focused on posting to Facebook. 45 to 50 per cent of these Pages make more than 5 updates per month
  • Personal brand Pages have 3.5 to 5 per cent Pages broadcasting more than 100 updates per month, with Politicians leading the fray

Figure 6: Posting habits of various categories

ii.            Cover Picture

One of the most visually attractive features released by Facebook after March is the Timeline view with a panoramic ‘Cover Picture’ at the top. Like most features on Facebook Pages, cover pictures are free and one can upload / change photos any number of times. Cover pictures are regarded to be important to convert non–fans into fans.

How many businesses jumped at the opportunity and got themselves an attractive cover picture? The study shows, not many. Following table illustrates the extent viagra best price to which cover pictures are underutilized.

Category

No Cover Picture

Actor/director

56.6%

Community

74.6%

Company

68.4%

Local business

54.7%

Musician/band

43.3%

Politician

47.8%

Public figure

65.5%

Restaurant/cafe

35.6%

Spas+

24.4%

Total

63.9%

Table 6: Cover picture usageFigure 7: Cover picture usage

  • 63.9 per cent of the Pages studied did not have a cover picture. This is consistent with the posting habits above, where we found that 70.2 per cent of Pages did not make any updates at all
  • Restaurants and Spas come up on top again, with nearly 3 in 4 spas and 2 in 3 restaurants uploading a cover photo
  • Community category has the highest percentage of Pages with no cover photo, but it is also surprising to see Company and Public Figure categories with low adoption

 iii.           Participation

Another interesting metric we studied is the participation rate of Pages. This measures if a Page has participated in at least one conversation on its Page, whether the conversation was initiated by itself or by a fan. Participation can be done by liking, sharing, or commenting on a post or comment.

Pages that haven’t conversed with any of their fans aren’t helping their social marketing cause. Following table shows the ‘no participation’ rates of Pages across various categories.

Category

Not participating

Actor/director

82.4%

Community

88.9%

Company

85.3%

Local business

78.0%

Musician/band

74.3%

Politician

74.8%

Public figure

84.7%

Restaurant/cafe

61.9%

Spas+

58.1%

Table 7: Participation rates across categories

  • Overall, 83.4 per cent of Pages studied ignored conversations on their own Page
  • Spas have relatively better activity than others, with 41.9 per cent of Spa Pages participating in conversations with fans, at least once

Page Activity

  • Less than 1 Facebook Page out of 3 is active in some way. 63.9 per cent Pages have no cover photo, 70.1 per cent make 0 posts a month and 83.4 per cent never participated in conversations. 50 per cent Pages also have less than 300 fans, indicating low levels of activity and popularity in general

Content and Engagement

A.      Content on Facebook Pages

Pages serious about making an impact on Facebook cannot ignore making regular posts. Page activity statistics show that only 29.9 per cent Pages post at least once per month. We studied the patterns of behavior and content preferences across categories.

Following table shows the posting habits of various categories in the sample of 2.94 million Pages:

Category

Average posts

per month (Mar-12)

Average posts

per month (Oct-12)

% change

Actor/director

31

24

-22.6%

Community

28

18

-35.7%

Company

15

9

-40.0%

Local business

11

11

0.0%

Musician/band

25

22

-12.0%

Politician

34

27

-20.6%

Public figure

20

18

-10.0%

Restaurant/cafe

18

12

-33.3%

Spas+

31

15

-51.6%

Table 8: Average Page posts

  • Overall, Facebook Pages have become more inactive after introduction of Timeline view. The March study found that Pages made 21 posts per month on average, but the recent study shows that the average has fallen to 17 updates per month
  • Politicians make the highest posts on average, followed by Actor/Director Pages
  • Company and Local business Pages, assumed to be the highest stake holders in social media marketing, make the least number of posts at 9 and 11 on average
  • Spas and Company Pages have witnessed a drastic fall in average updates from March, whereas personal brands in general and local business Pages have seen only a marginal fall

Since a large part of the sample contained Pages making no posts at all, we analyzed the average posting habits again, considering only Pages that made at least one post per month. The average posting numbers dramatically changed, when we eliminated the ‘0 update’ Pages.

Category

Average posts by active* Pages

Actor/director

73

Community

87

Company

35

Local business

27

Musician/band

48

Politician

60

Public figure

65

Restaurant/cafe

20

Spas+

22

Table 9: Monthly average posts by active* Pages

*       ‘Active’ Pages for the purpose of this table mean Pages which made at least one post per month

  • Active Pages (which make at least one post per month) make 55 posts on average
  • Active Community Pages make the highest number of posts per month with nearly 3 posts per day, followed by Actor/Director category
  • Restaurants and Spas still rank low on average posts, with even active Pages making less than one post per day

Figure 8: Average posts by active Pages

B.      Content Type

Facebook advocates visual posts to increase engagement. After introduction of the Timeline view, visual posts have a much better impact. Content type mix for various categories is as follows. Only active Pages (Pages making at least one post per month) are considered for calculating the averages.

The table below contains the average posts of each type made by various categories.

Category

Photo

Video

Status

Link

Question

Actor/director

55.1%

3.9%

27.6%

13.4%

0.1%

Community

53.5%

3.5%

27.7%

15.2%

0.1%

Company

47.6%

3.9%

23.1%

25.3%

0.2%

Local business

44.7%

3.4%

28.8%

23.1%

0.1%

Musician/band

41.5%

11.4%

35.1%

11.8%

0.1%

Politician

45.6%

7.7%

24.0%

22.6%

0.1%

Public figure

51.3%

3.9%

32.0%

12.7%

0.1%

Restaurant/cafe

45.1%

1.8%

42.8%

10.1%

0.1%

Spas+

56.3%

1.5%

31.9%

10.3%

0.1%

Table 10: Monthly average posts of each content type

  • There is a clear bias for visual content on Facebook as the table above illustrates
  • Musicians and Politician show a higher preference for videos than other categories
  • Company, Local business and Politician categories share more links than other categories
  • Restaurants make higher status updates than the others at 42.8 percent
  • All categories ask negligible number of questions
  • Other types of content such as Offers, Stories and RSS feeds were not considered for the study

The table below reveals the share of visual posts (Photo and Video) in the content shared, illustrating the changing preferences of Pages.

Categories

March 2012

October

2012

Actor/director

18.3%

58.9%

Community

14.1%

57.0%

Company

13.8%

51.5%

Local

business

15.8%

48.1%

Musician/band

14.1%

53.0%

Politician

17.2%

53.4%

Public figure

15.9%

55.2%

Restaurant/cafe

15.5%

46.9%

Spas+

18.9%

57.8%

Table 11: Share of visual content

Figure 9: Share of visual content in Page posts

  • Across categories, 50 to 60 per cent of posts are either photos or videos. This is a dramatic increase from the 15 to 20

    per cent level during March. Overall, there is a whopping 260 per cent increase in the share of visual posts. Clearly, Timeline managed to make a very strong impact on the content mix!

  • Share of status (text) messages, which used to be 47.1 per cent in March, has fallen to 28.8 per cent in October
  • Restaurants and Spas made fewer video posts compared to other categories

Content type

  • Pages are quickly adapting to visual content after the introduction of Timeline, giving Facebook a reason to cheer about its acquisition of Instagram

 C.      Engagement rates

Engaging with fans is the primary goal for Facebook Pages. Engagement begins with feedback given by fans on Page posts in the form of ‘comments’, ‘likes’ and ‘shares’. Without conversations with fans, Pages are mere vehicles for broadcasting, like a one-way radio. Pages that manage to post interesting content regularly and appeal to their fans, get healthy engagement.

Following table shows the engagement rates that each category achieved during the period of study, compared to the observations during March:

Category

Engagement rate (Mar-12)

Engagement rate (Oct-12)

% change

Actor/director

1.07%

0.56%

-47.6%

Community

1.38%

0.33%

-75.9%

Company

0.74%

0.38%

-48.5%

Local business

0.55%

0.50%

-8.5%

Musician/band

1.02%

0.51%

-49.8%

Politician

1.15%

0.96%

-16.4%

Public figure

1.01%

0.50%

-50.6%

Restaurant/cafe

1.02%

0.84%

-17.2%

Spas+care

1.83%

1.23%

-32.7%

Table 12: Engagement rate per category

Figure 10: Engagement rates

  • Compared to March 2012, engagement rates have fallen by 8.5 to 75.9 per cent across categories, with Community Pages being the most affected
  • Spa category Pages outstrip everyone with a very healthy 1.23 per cent engagement rate, even though it represents a 32.7 per cent drop from March
  • Politicians scored well to rank second for engagement rate. Clearly, the election season in the US has an effect!
  • Community Pages get the least engagement at 0.33 percent and the engagement rate has fallen by over 75 per cent

Engagement Rates

  • Engagement Rates have fallen by an average of about 40 per cent since March indicating waning popularity of Page posts. Pages need to change their approach to content and produce more engaging content and less marketing speak

D.      Engagement by content type

One of the

key assertions made by Facebook and social media experts is that visual content is more engaging for fans than other types. The dramatic increase in the share of visual content is also a direct result of these assertions.

We studied engagement rates[vi] by various content types to validate this.

Category

ER for Photos

ER for Videos

ER for Status

ER for

Links

ER for Questions

Actor/director

0.72%

0.10%

0.18%

0.07%

0.03%

Community

0.40%

0.05%

0.14%

0.05%

0.03%

Company

0.48%

0.06%

0.12%

0.09%

0.02%

Local business

0.65%

0.05%

0.19%

0.11%

0.02%

Musician/band

0.59%

0.25%

0.26%

0.13%

0.03%

Politician

1.06%

0.20%

0.44%

0.28%

0.10%

Public figure

0.65%

0.08%

0.18%

0.06%

0.03%

Restaurant/cafe

1.12%

0.06%

0.38%

0.15%

0.03%

Spas+

1.53%

0.06%

0.54%

0.21%

0.05%

Table 13: Engagement rate for various content types

Clearly, photos seem to be getting much higher engagement than other types. On further analysis, we found that visual content (photos and videos) generated 65 to 350 percent higher engagement than non-visual content, across categories.

Category

ER – Visual content (V)

ER – Non visual content (N)

(V) / (N)

Actor/director

0.57%

0.18%

309.8%

Community

0.34%

0.13%

260.6%

Company

0.39%

0.15%

262.0%

Local business

0.51%

0.20%

254.8%

Musician/band

0.53%

0.32%

165.3%

Politician

0.98%

0.53%

183.3%

Public figure

0.51%

0.16%

319.6%

Restaurant/cafe

0.85%

0.19%

453.8%

Spas/beauty/personal care

1.24%

0.31%

396.0%

Table 14: Engagement rate for visual content (Oct 2012)

Figure 11 Engagement rates of visual content

A quick comparison with March findings revealed that this huge contrast in engagement rates is relatively recent. During March, engagement rates were not hugely different for visual content compared to other content types. Following table shows the results from March 2012 study:

Category

ER for visual content (V)

ER for non visual content (N)

(V) / (N)

Actor/director

0.83%

0.75%

110.2%

Community

0.62%

0.49%

126.8%

Company

0.38%

0.35%

17.0%

Local business

0.62%

0.87%

-129.1%

Musician/band

0.60%

0.76%

-121.9%

Politician

1.13%

0.70%

161.1%

Public figure

2.02%

1.31%

154.9%

Restaurant/cafe

0.74%

1.03%

-128.4%

Spas+

0.87%

0.72%

120.8%

Table 15: Engagement rate for visual content (Mar 2012)

  • Engagement rates of non visual content like status messages have fallen drastically since March. There is only one obvious reason for this – the Timeline layout which highlights visual content over others.
  • Even though engagement rates for Pages have fallen in general, visual content has taken an upper hand over non visual content. This trend is true across all categories
  • Spas have consistently shown a higher bias for visual content and have gotten higher engagement too

Engagement rates of various content types

  • With the arrival of Timeline view for Pages, visual content has become very important for engagement

 Conversation Score Analysis

Conversation Score (CScore) measures the effectiveness of a Facebook Page on four parameters – broadcasting, popularity, content virality and response to fans. CScore measures this on a scale of 0 to 100. More can be read about CScore here.

In the sample of 2.94 million Pages, we found that barely 13.6 per cent Pages crossed a respectable CScore of 40 (denoting 2 CScore stars out of 5). A massive 78.0 per cent of Pages had a CScore of 20 or less, indicating low level of activity and fan response. This again, is consistent with the inactivity levels we discussed earlier in the study.

Figure 12: Conversation Score distribution

  • Restaurants and Spas score better than the rest with 28.3 per cent and 32.6 per cent Pages crossing CScore of 40 respectively
  • Community and Company Pages are at the bottom of the table with barely 1 out of 10 Pages crossing the 40 CScore mark

Conclusion

With the introduction of Timeline view, Facebook aimed to make Pages more popular with both businesses and fans. However, due to high levels of inactivity from Page owners and also falling engagement from fans, businesses are still not able to use Pages effectively. With visual content giving much higher engagement than before, businesses need to change their content strategies to be able to fully utilize the opportunity to access a social network with over one billion active users.


[iii] Estimated applying a monthly growth rate of 3.07% – the rate at which Facebook’s monthly active users are growing since December 2010

[iv] For the purposes of this study, we re-categorized all ‘community / cause’ related Pages in to Community category. No other changes were made in the data.

[v] Assumed to be Monthly Active numbers, since Facebook usually reports Monthly Active numbers for its usage statistics

[vi] Engagement represents Likes, Comments and Shares for a post per fan

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Kris

Kris handles finance, product, marketing, customer relations, processes etc at Recommend.ly. That's because, as much as he'd like to, he can't code to save his life. He is the non-techie in a technology world. Fringe, really!

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